Common Dental FAQ

Asking questions is a part of good oral health care. To help answer your questions, Dawson Dental has prepared responses to frequently asked dental questions questions and dental term definitions.

Are you accepting new patients?

Of course! We always accept new patients.

Dentist pricing and dental benefits coverage

We get asked about dental costs and whether or not dental insurance benefits will cover the cost all the time. In short, we follow the Ontario Dental Fee guide and insurance coverage is different for each plan. Our teams are very knowledgable on each provider and can help you determine what you may or may not be covered for. For a more detailed description on dental costs and benefit coverage, refer to our pricing info or download one of our information guides.

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first time?

The Canadian Dental Association (CDA) encourages the assessment of infants, by a dentist, within 6 months of the eruption of the first tooth or by one year of age. If you think there is a problem, however, take your child to the dentist right away, no matter what age. Learn more about child dental care.

Do I really have to go to the dentist every six months?

How often you visit depends on your oral health needs. Prevention is key to ensuring small problems don’t turn into more expensive or even tooth loss, later. Your dentist and/or hygienist may suggest that you visit more or less often depending on how well you care for your teeth and gums and if you have problems that need to be checked or treated.

Do I need x-rays at each visit?

How often you need to have x-rays also depends on your oral health. If you have not had cavities or other problems for a couple of years then you probably won’t need x-rays at every appointment. If your dentist is monitoring your treatment progress, you may require more frequent x-rays.

If you are not sure why a particular x-ray is being taken, just ask. Remember that dental x-rays deliver very little radiation; they are a vital tool for your dentist to assess your oral health.

I have really sensitive teeth and need relief!

Dealing with tooth sensitivity is an uncomfortable condition. There are some treatments that the dentist can provide along with home care to help maintain relief.

Can I eat right away after having a filling done?

Yes, the material is already set, however, if you have received freezing for today’s appointment, we recommend that you avoid chewing anything on that side or eating anything very hot until the freezing wears off. We wouldn’t want you to bite your cheek or burn your mouth without realizing it.

How much brighter will my teeth get with ZOOM whitening?

ZOOM whitening is one of the best whitening products on the market and can get teeth anywhere from 2- 10 shades whiter. It’s impossible to guarantee that your teeth will go very white because everyone’s shade is different. It will help them get as white as genetically possible!

Understanding Common Insurance Dental Terms

Annual Maximum:

Most insurance companies have an annual maximum amount of coverage for each patient listed under the insurance policy.

Deductible:

The dollar amount the patient must pay toward their treatment total before insurance coverage begins.

Eligibility:

Some dental services and treatments that are clinically necessary are not covered by dental benefits. These are considered exclusions and are usually described in the patient’s insurance booklet.

Co-Payment:

Also known as “Out of Pocket Portion”.  This is the part of the treatment fee not covered by your dental benefits.  The insurance company usually pays a certain percentage of the treatment fee.

Dual Coverage:

This is when a patient is covered under two different insurance plans.  The insurance companies usually coordinate the benefits so that the patient does not receive more than 100% of the cost of treatment.

Assignment:

This happens when a patient requests that the insurance company pay the dentist directly.  If this happens, the patient is responsible to pay for the “Out of Pocket Portion” at the time of treatment.